Tuesday, September 22, 2009

{Sewing Practice}

The jury is out on my sewing talents, and it's not lookin' good.

But I have faith that I'll get there! (Maybe that faith is being
frugal in disguise. I really want to be able to hem a pair of pants
after spending $139 on alterations last week.)

It appears sewing doesn't come naturally to me though, but I
want to learn. I do. And I will. At some level, anyway.

I'd at least like to be able to make some basic stitches for crafting.
Eventually, it'd be nice to make a blanket or some curtains, but
I've got a long way to go for that. I haven't even bought fabric yet.



I don't know what I expect. I got one lesson from Barb when I
bought the machine in June, and then I spent an hour or two
with it on Saturday afternoon. In my impatience, I want to be
able to make quilts like this immediately.

Anyway...

On Saturday -- I got my machine out, revisited how to load a
bobbin and thread the needle. Then, I practiced. It was fun,
and I'm so glad I did it.



I didn't really make anything in particular. I was trying to
sew around the edge of paper. Sounds easy enough, but I
struggled to keep the peddle at an even pace and the material
straight. Even though I tried a bunch of times...



And then when I was stitching a box around some paper,
I somehow managed to make a massive knot with the thread.
So, I decided that was enough for one day. :)



I'm going to watch a couple YouTube videos and try this again.

Getting my sewing machine out and doing something with it
was part of my resolutions for September. So, I feel good to
have accomplished that, and now, I'm considering signing up
for a class at JoAnne's.

1 comment:

Miss M! said...

When I was ten, and learning to use a sewing machine for the first time, we had to practice on a plain sheet of paper with NO THREAD first. First, there were pages with straight lines - just up and down the page. You practiced sewing so that the holes the needle made were on the line. When you could do that, you moved on to a spiral with angled corners - like a square spiral I guess you'd call it. That's where you'd practice how to make right angles. Then, finally, you'd do a curved spiral. You started at the outside (biggest circle) and then worked your way in. This reinforced the control you learned with the other exercises, and also taught you to pace yourself, because if you went too fast you wouldn't be able to stay on the line. We just used paper and no thread because then we didn't waste thread practicing, and the holes show you if you're going where you're supposed to go anyway.

Email me if this makes no sense at all. :)